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Course Descriptions

BI 102
Geocaching/Orienteering (1)
This is a credit outdoor expedition course open to all undergraduate students.  The application of a GPS (global positioning unit) while navigating and orienteering is the foundation for this course.  The identification of plants and land structures specific to Ursuline campus are the underlying themes of this course. The impact humans have had on this environment and the historical landmarks significant to Ursuline Community will be incorporated.

BI 111
Human Environment (3)
This course explores the interrelatedness of our modern life style with the natural world. Consideration is given to basic ecological principles, the availability and conservation of natural resources, the impact of human beings on the quality of their environment, and socioeconomic and political determinants of environmental policies. NOT FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS.
Ursuline Studies Stage I Science satellite.

BI 111L
Laboratory for Human Environment (1)
An introduction to methods and techniques involved in ecological investigations. Focus is on aquatic and terrestrial environments, population growth, energy transfers, and biotic and abiotic cycles. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 111.

BI 120
Human Genetics (3)
A one semester course that explores genetics and its applications to humans. Topics include chromosomal and molecular inheritance, population genetics, and its applications to humans. As feasible, Human Genome Project and uses and controversies regarding stem cells will be considered.  NOT FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS.
Ursuline Studies Stage I Science satellite.

BI 120L
Laboratory for Human Genetics (1)
Principles of inheritance and population genetics are explored through hands-on activities and computer simulations. Accentuates topics covered in lecture. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 120.

BI 130
Human Biology: Birth through Aging (3)
A one-semester survey course for students having limited exposure to previous academic science courses. The structure and function of the principle organ systems and the means by which these body systems change with age are emphasized; many physiological concepts are explored in more detail through hands-on laboratory exercises. The concept of homeostasis and the effects of development and aging on the ability to maintain homeostasis are unifying themes of this course; thus, common pathologies as well as the impact of the environment and of heredity on the quality of life are interjected as topics as time permits. NOT FOR BIOLOGY MAJORS. Ursuline Studies Stage I Science satellite.

BI 130L
Laboratory for Human Biology: Birth through Aging (1)
Physiological concepts of the principle organ systems and the means by which these body systems change with age are explored in more detail through hands-on laboratory exercises. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 130.
 
BI 200
Introductory Biology – Biodiversity, Form, Function, and Ecology (3)
This course provides an introduction to modern biology including biological classification, survey of biological diversity and evolutionary relationships, anatomy and physiology of plants and animals, and principles of ecology. This course with lab and BI 205 with lab provide a comprehensive two-semester sequence in general biology. REQUIRED FOR ALL BIOLOGY MAJORS.
Ursuline Studies Stage I Science satellite.

BI 200L
Laboratory for Introductory Biology – Biodiversity, Form, Function, and Ecology (1)
The Laboratory is comprised of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BI 200 including hands on activities which afford students the opportunity to master basic biological principles, skills, and equipment used in experimental inquiry, design, analysis, and reporting. REQUIRED FOR ALL BIOLOGY MAJORS. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 200.
 
BI 205
Introductory Biology – Cells, Genetics, Energy Transfer, and Evolution (3)
This course provides an introduction to modern biology including the basic principles of molecular and cell biology, energy transfer and metabolism, cellular reproduction, genetics, and mechanisms of evolution and origin of life. This course with lab and BI 200 with lab provide a comprehensive two-semester sequence in general biology. REQUIRED FOR ALL BIOLOGY MAJORS.
Pre-requisite: one semester of college chemistry.

BI 205L
Laboratory for Introductory Biology – Cells, Genetics, Energy Transfer, and Evolution (1)
The Laboratory is comprised of selected exercises designed to reinforce concepts covered in BI 205 including hands on activities which afford students the opportunity to master basic biological principles, skills, and equipment used in experimental inquiry, design, analysis, and reporting. REQUIRED FOR ALL BIOLOGY MAJORS. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 205.

BI 206
Principles of Plant Biology (3)
A survey of the Kingdom Plantae and representative members of the Kingdoms Protista and Fungi. Topics include taxonomy, anatomy, morphology, and physiology of plants with a detailed study of their cells, tissues, organs, life cycles, and uses.
Pre-requisite: BI 205

BI 206L
Laboratory for Principles of Plant Biology (1)
Exploration of anatomy, morphology, and physiology of higher plants with taxonomic treatment of selected algae, fungi, bryophytes, and vascular plants. Pre-requisite: BI 205L or equivalent; Pre- or co-requisite: BI 206.

BI 207
Principles of Animal Biology (3)
Principles and concepts of animal biology based on comparison of structures and functions of the principal invertebrate and vertebrate types. 

BI 207L
Laboratory of Principles of Animal Biology (1)
Study of the structures of representative animals from unicellular organisms through vertebrates, including their development and interrelationships. Correlations of organ structure with functional aspects are considered. Focus of course is on the invertebrate organisms. Pre -or co-requisite: BI 207.
 
BI 214
Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3)
A study of human anatomy and physiology for students preparing for an allied health profession.  Integration of structure and function in the light of homeostasis is emphasized. A systems approach is utilized, with the focus on normal physiology and an introduction to pathology. Systems addressed in the first semester include skeletal, muscle, nervous and endocrine.
Recommended: high school biology and chemistry.

BI 214L
Laboratory for Human Anatomy and Physiology I (1)
A study of the structure of the human body using a variety of tools including tissue slides, human skeletons, models, and the optional dissection of various organs of sheep, pig, or cow. Integration is accomplished via a systems approach with physiology using computer simulation. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 214.

BI 215
Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3)
A study of human anatomy and physiology for students preparing for an allied health profession. Integration of structure and function in the light of homeostasis is emphasized. A systems approach is utilized, with the focus on normal physiology and an introduction to pathology. In the second semester, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems are addressed.
Pre-requisite: BI 214.

BI 215L
Laboratory for Human Anatomy and Physiology II  (1)
A study of the structure of the human body using a variety of tools including tissue slides, human skeletons, models, and the optional dissection of various organs of sheep, pig, or cow. Integration is accomplished via a systems approach with physiology using computer simulation. Pre-requisite: BI 214L; Pre- or co-requisite: BI 215.
 
BI 220
Human Genetics and Genomics (3)
Exploration of genetics and genomics as it applies to humans. Topics include chromosomal and molecular inheritance, population genetics, and its applications to humans. Human Genome Project, stem cell research, gene therapy, genetic testing and genetic screening will be considered. Various practical approaches will be included, as appropriate, based on emerging research and technology.

BI 232
Clinical Microbiology (3)
Clinical Microbiology introduces the student to organisms that are seen with the assistance of a microscope. Topics include the biological characteristics, cellular processes, and physiology of microorganisms that are pathogenic, beneficial, or essential to human life; diseases and illnesses caused by viruses or microorganisms; and the human immune system and its ability to fend the body against infections under normal conditions. Recommended: 1 semester of college chemistry, and either BI 214& 215 or BI 205.

BI 232L
Laboratory for Clinical Microbiology (1)
Application of basic techniques for culturing, staining, and identifying selected microbial forms.  Pre- or co-requisite: BI 232.

BI 288
Special Topics in Biology (1-4)
A study of designated or selected topics designed to serve special needs and interests not included in regularly scheduled courses. Offered as needed.

BI 300
Introduction to Medical Terminology (1)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with terminology relating to basic anatomy and physiology of body systems. The language of medicine, medical abbreviations, definition of medical terms, and an appreciation of the logical method found in medical terminology are covered. Course format consists of programmed self-instruction and online testing. 

BI 310
Pathophysiology (3)
This is an introduction to the basic concepts of pathophysiology with emphasis on phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function and the resulting human response. Upon completion the student will understand pathophysiological changes, including how pathological processes are manifested, mechanism of disease, progress in the body, primary and secondary effects, and alterations in functions affecting individuals. Pre-requisite: BI 214 and BI 215, or the equivalent.

BI 313
Field Biology (2)
Systematics and identification of flora and fauna of Northeast Ohio. Topics rotate each semester among ornithology, local flora, entomology, invertebrate zoology, mycology, or mammalogy. See the course schedule for specific semester offering.
Co-requisite: BI 313L.

BI 313L
Laboratory in Field Biology (2)
Study organisms will be located, observed, and identified in their native habitat. Organisms may be collected. Appropriate clothing for varied weather conditions is necessary for field trips. Co-requisite: BI 313.

PREREQUISITES FOR ALL COURSES AT OR ABOVE BI 320
PREREQUISITES: 
(1) SEQUENCE OF BIOLOGY FUNDAMENTAL COURSES (BI 200, BI 200L, BI 205 AND BI 205L);  
(2) TWO SEMESTERS COLLEGE CHEMISTRY; AND 
(3) THREE CREDITS OF COLLEGE MATH AS REQUIRED.

BI 320
Developmental Biology (2)
Interactions among cells which result in the development of multicellular organisms are examined. Major topics include germ cells and fertilization, cellular mechanisms of development, and differentiated cells and the maintenance of tissues. Although aspects of plant and invertebrate development are considered, vertebrates are the focus of this course. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS

BI 320L
Laboratory for Developmental Biology (2)
This laboratory component focuses on the means by which the organs of representative organisms develop from fertilized eggs. Lab materials may include stained slides, living and preserved materials, models and computer simulations. Experimental investigations will be conducted as feasible. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 320.

BI 325
Ecology (2)
An introduction to the basic concepts of ecology with emphasis on the complex interrelationships of living organisms with each other and with the non-living environment. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS Recommended: MAT 131 College Algebra or MAT 212 Statistics.  

BI 325L
Laboratory for Ecology (2)
The focus is on techniques of physical, chemical, and biological analysis of various ecosystems. The collection, analysis, and interpretation of data are stressed. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 325.

BI 333
Environmental Microbiology (3)
A general study of the morphology and physiology of microorganisms. Basic techniques peculiar to the handling of these special organisms are considered. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS.

BI 333L
Laboratory for Environmental Microbiology (1)
Although the emphasis is on bacteria in this course, fungi, algae and viruses are also included in the various investigations. Topics include sterile technique, biochemical and physiological reactions, and chemical diagnostic tests. Antibiotics, antiseptics, and immunological tests are included as feasible.  Pre- or co-requisite: BI 333.

BI 350
Comparative Animal Physiology (2)
This course utilizes a comparative approach to explore the physiological diversity among animals.  Emphasis will be placed on how animals function in their environment. Major topics include: oxygen, food and energy, temperature, water, movement, information and integration. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS.

BI 350L
Laboratory for Comparative Animal Physiology (2)
The laboratory will be an introduction to research strategies and methods used primarily in animal physiology.  Experimental preparation design will be emphasized.  The student will be encouraged to explore areas of interest in detail. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 350.

BI 380
Advanced Physiology and Immunology (3)
An inquiry into the nature of the immune response at the molecular, cellular, and systemic levels. Principles relating to clinical immunology, immunologic responses, and the function and the evolution of the immune system are discussed in terms of underlying experimental studies. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS.

BI 400
Service Learning (1)
One credit minimum of service learning (no tuition charge) is required for graduation with a major in Biology. (See the College Catalog for rules and restrictions applicable for earning service learning credit.) In Biology this can be accomplished in the junior or senior year by several methods:
    1) Volunteering within the community in some aspect of biology education. 
    2) Volunteering in a community organization and conducting research which impacts biologically related issues. 
    3) Being a laboratory assistant in an Ursuline College Biology Lab for a semester.  
Each option has a particular subset of requirements, one of which is Departmental approval.  REQUIRED FOR ALL BIOLOGY MAJORS. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS. 

BI 420
Molecular Biology (3)
An inquiry into molecular biology and its applications. Topics include the molecular evolution of genes, DNA replication, RNA transcription, gene regulation, protein synthesis, and their use in primary research.  As feasible, special biological pathways will be discussed. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS.

BI 430
Cellular and Biochemical Processes (3)
The fine structure, molecular organization, and function of eukaryotic cells, including their relationship to the environment, are examined. Major topics include the origin of eukaryotic cells; protein structure and function; the transport of substances and signaling mechanisms that occur both within and between intra- and extracellular compartments; energy pathways and constraints; and, when possible, disease states resulting from cell dysfunction will be examined. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS.

BI 430L
Laboratory for Cellular and Biochemical Processes (1)
Selected exercises introduce laboratory techniques of cellular biology. Investigations examine cell structure via microscopy and centrifugation, cellular physiology, and protein isolation and expression. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 430.

BI 435
Genetics (3)
Although basic mechanisms of Mendelian genetics are reviewed, the focus of this course is molecular genetics. The origin of nucleic acids, DNA replication, RNA transcription, and the process of translation are studied in some detail. Regulation of gene expression and the function of non-structural DNA sequences are also considered. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS. Recommended: MAT 131 College Algebra.

BI 435L
Laboratory in Genetics (1)
An introduction to methods and techniques of investigating genetic principles, including Mendelian inheritance, molecular genetics, and population genetics. Organisms used in the laboratory are representative of those used in research settings. Pre- or co-requisite: BI 435.

BI 451
Departmental Seminar: Evolution(3)
Readings and discussions focus on one or more of the universal biological principles. Biological concepts from previous course work are integrated using an evolutionary perspective. REQUIRED FOR ALL BIOLOGY MAJORS. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; 3 credits of MAT/MIS, and senior standing.

BI 452
BI 452A
- Experimental Project I (1) and
BI 452B
- Experimental Project II (2)
Each student writes a research proposal based on readings in the scientific literature during one semester (BI 452A). The research experience is encapsulated in both a final paper and a presentation open to the College community (BI 452B). Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; 3 credits of MAT/MIS, senior standing, and departmental approval.

BI 453
BI 453A
- Senior Thesis I (1) and 
BI 453B- Senior Thesis II (2)
Each student reads primary research articles within an area of interest, suggests a biology-based topic for a research proposal, and writes the general background for a formal peer-review proposal in scientific format during one semester (BI 453A). All remaining aspects of the formal peer-review proposal are completed in scientific format and a presentation open to the College community is given during the second semester (BI 453B). Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2semesters of College Chemistry; 3 credits of MAT/MIS, senior standing, and departmental approval.

BI 461, 462
Independent Study (1-3, 1-3)
Study of a particular topic in biology.
Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; 3 credits of MAT/MIS, and approval of department chair.

BI 475
Academic Internship (1-3)
An off-campus learning experience that provides the student with the opportunity to relate academic and educational goals to learning experiences and situations beyond the limits of the classroom. Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS.

BI 488
Special Topics in Biology (1-4)
A study of designated or selected topics designed to serve special needs and interests not included in regularly scheduled courses.
Pre-requisites: Biology fundamental sequence; 2 semesters of College Chemistry; and 3 credits of MAT/MIS. Pre-requisites, if any, will be stipulated in the course syllabus as required.

BI 199, 299, 399, 499
External Learning Assessment (credit varies)
Measurable and verifiable learning which has occurred outside of the traditional classroom. Numerical designation indicates level of proficiency in the topic. Courses for which there is an exact Ursuline College equivalent are listed by the appropriate numerical designation. “PL” is listed before all course titles for which credit is granted through external learning assessment.