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Ursuline Alumnae @UrsulineAlumnae   #tbt #throwbackthursday "Framed for Art: Art Majors" (photo: UC yearbook 1976)
School of Arts and Sciences | Art Course Descriptions

AR 103
Fundamentals in Studio Art (3)
Primarily a course for UCAP students, this course provides an experience of the visual arts, through some hands-on applications along with the use of 21st-century technology and visits to galleries, artists, and arts administrators, as well as reading and writing about the visual arts.

AR 106
Design Foundations I (3/4)
In this course, stress is placed on the analysis and application of abstract visual principles and the elements of design in two-dimensional projects as well as experimentation in a variety of materials and techniques with the aid of computer technology. Students begin to understand, in an historical context, the voice and the creative efforts of artists by viewing digital images of past and present works of art. Required for art majors; open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies II Aesthetic Response satellite (AE).

AR 107
Drawing I (3/4)
Using the basic materials of drawing, students move from a synthetic, holistic view of various subjects to analytical placement of form, value and line in a problem-solving format. Considerable exposure to the drawn image, past and present, is given in order to foster new attitudes toward the activities of seeing and drawing. Students encounter life drawing as a part of this course and are introduced to technology as an art tool in the manipulation of images by machines such as the photocopier and digital and Polaroid cameras. Required for art majors, open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies Stage II Aesthetic Response (AE).

AR 108
Painting I (3/4)
Using water-based paints, this course offers a progressive study of the elements of painting, including grounds, supports, methods of application, and value and color. Composition is approached through sketches and/or the manipulation of images through the use of technology, such as slides, digital cameras, computer, and photocopier. The course uses a problem-solving format and embraces content through assignments reflecting mood and the relation between audience and artist. Required for art majors, open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies Stage II Aesthetic Response (AE).

AR 112
Digital Photography (3)
This course offers an introductory survey of the art of digital photography. The differences between film and digital will be explored, and the important criteria and resources for choosing a camera and accessories will be identified. During the course, students will learn how to improve the photos they take by controlling both the composition and subject matter, and creative, theoretical, and technical aspects will be considered. Each of the steps that produce a digital photograph, digital camera techniques, software viewing, and image editing, will be covered. Picasa2 and Apple's iPhoto for image organization, and the latest version of Adobe Photoshop for the digital darkroom will be the primary software used. This course is intended for students who shoot for personal, business or professional purposes, as well as for photography enthusiasts. Required for Visual Communication Design Majors. Prerequisites: none.

AR 114
Introduction to Visual Communication Design (3/4)
This course is a survey of the graphic and digital arts. It is a basic digital and hands-on design class with emphasis on the creative process. Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and QuickTime movie are incorporated into the projects allowing students to gain experience in digital and time-based art. Required for Visual Communication Design majors and Studio Arts majors; open to non-majors.

AR 115
Introduction to Ceramics (3/4)
This foundation course introduces students to the principles, elements, and skills necessary to create in clay; computer technology is used to aid students in taking designs from two to three dimensions. Students are encouraged to express their voice concerning global issues and contemporary concerns through clay sculptures, vessels, installations and mixed media artwork. Required for Studio Art majors; open to non-art majors.

AR 200
Metalcraft (3/4)
This course introduces students to the design fundamentals necessary to work with non-ferrous metal and enameling. With computer technology, students create designs for a series of studio problems. Techniques of soldering, fabrication, sawing, filing, chasing, polishing, forming, and enameling are introduced. Students are encouraged to use the metal and enameling media as a means of expression, giving voice to a concept or issue that is meaningful to them, within a world view. Installation, multi-media, time-based projects are encouraged. Required for studio art majors; open to non-art majors.

AR 203
Introduction to Printmaking (3/4)
This course surveys the methods of making prints as well as their value through art and political history. Students are exposed to a variety of manual and digital/technological tools while exploring the methods and surfaces used in various printing and etching processes. Students also study inks, papers, and how they influence the printed image, as well as the historical uses of printmaking in advocating social change. Required for art majors; open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 107 or permission of the instructor.

AR 206
Design Foundations II (3/4)
Using a problem-solving approach, this course provides continued studies in the principles and elements of art in 2- and 3-dimensional design with the aid of computer technology. Students are required to complete a series of studio problems that explore their conceptual ideas, values, social issues of the day as well as learning technical skills and contemporary ways of presenting their artwork through time-based design, installations, and multi-media. Required for Studio Art majors; open to non-art majors.

AR 208
The Figure: Traditional and in Time and Motion (4)
This course is about the human form. It begins with the traditional life-drawing format, continues with the body as it ages, and ends with the body in motion. Students work with models, grids, photocopiers, and SLR cameras for slides, Polaroid cameras for transfers, and digital cameras and video cameras as they master images of the human form changing through time and space. Cameras, digital and/or 35mm, required. Fieldtrips required. Prerequisite: AR 107.

AR 210 (cross-registered with MIS 250)
Visual Communication Design I (3/4)
Working with Adobe Photoshop and QuarkXpress, students continue their studies in text placement, color, layout and basic design, and learn to use external digital enhancements. Emphasis is placed on desktop publishing. Required for Visual Communication Design majors; open to non-majors.

AR 211
Visual Communication Design II (3/4)
Continued studies in graphic design utilizing Adobe Illustrator , and other programs with digital technologies such as the camera and scanner in order for the student to become adept in managing good design at this level. Required for Visual Communication Design majors; open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 114.

AR 215
Portrait I (4)
Using charcoal, graphite, pastel, ink and paint, the power of portraiture will be explored through achieving a likeness, effecting mood, and by exploiting the use of slides, multiples, photocopies, and the camera. Emphasis will be on composition, the use of value, and experimenting with scale. Students with an interest in portraiture and knowledgeable in other fields, such as painting, photography and printmaking, are encouraged to take this course. Prerequisites: AR 107 and AR 108.

AR 219
Drawing II (4)
Examination of the subject and media of drawing dealing with landscape, the portrait, perspective, and scale. This course allows for color work and study and permits the student to select content that is meaningful and which is intended to provide meaning for a viewer. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 107.

AR 231
Painting II (4)
This course is about the chemistry of different kinds of paints-acrylic, oil, watercolor and pastel-so that they can be used separately and layered, with confidence, on particular supports. Students learn where pigments come from, how paints are made, and how to read archival and safety symbols on professional artists paint tubes. Students create various glazed paintings, all prima paintings, and combinations of them. The course emphasizes color and its relation to value, explored by creating all-white and all-black paintings with various values, textures, and hues. Students are encouraged to use digital, slide, and photocopy images as a method of arriving at scale and creating compositions. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 108.

AR 232

Painting in Nature (4)
Using a choice of water-based and oil paints, this course offers a progressive study of painting in the outdoors. The focus of this class is fieldwork. Students will learn to develop approaches to painting on location. A large percentage of the class will be direct observational painting at various regional places. Discussions and readings related to landscape and nature will also be used. Open to majors and non-majors

AR 235
Intermediate Ceramics (4)
This course builds on the skills learned in AR 115 and heightens the students' tactile and three-dimensional sense of expression through the techniques of handbuilding. Students use technology as another tool while working in clay and become aware of the many choices of materials and firing methods while working on a more personal series of studio problems. Open to non- majors. Prerequisite: AR 115.

AR 250
History of Women in the Arts (3)
This course explores the work of women artists, patrons, and scholars who have made an impact on the development and understanding of the canon of Western art. Beginning in ancient Greece, the course touches upon woman in the arts through the twentieth century. Ursuline Studies Stage II Aesthetic Response satellite (AE).

AR 251
Survey of Ancient World Art: Prehistory to 1250(3)
A survey of world art from 30,000 B.C.E. through 1250 C.E., this course addresses art from Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, the Ancient Near East, Sub-Saharan Africa, India, as well as the Islamic world. During the course students are introduced to a variety of methods and techniques employed by art historians as they work to understand an art object. Special attention is paid to the relation a work of art has to the culture that produced it, and to the complex roles these objects play in contemporary society. Open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies Stage II World Culture satellite (WO).

AR 252
Survey of Western Art: 1250 to Today(3)
This course offers a survey of western art and architecture, covering the Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo periods from 1250 to 1750. Students are introduced to a variety of methods and techniques employed by art historians as they work to understand an art object. Special attention is paid to artwork in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies Stage II Aesthetic Response satellite (AE).

AR 253
Survey of Art History III (3)
This course offers a survey of Western art from 1750 through 1900. During the course students are introduced to a variety of methods and theoretical approaches employed by art historians as they work to understand an art object. Special attention is paid to artwork in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art. Open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies Stage II Aesthetic Response satellite (AE).

AR 254
Modern Art(3)
This is a survey of twentieth-century western art from the Fauves through Postmodernism. During the course students are introduced to a variety of methods and theoretical approaches employed by art historians as they work to understand an art object. Special attention is paid to architecture in Cleveland and art in local collections. Open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies Stage II Aesthetic Response satellite (AE).

AR 255
Survey of Non-Western Art(3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to non-western art through study of the various art forms of other cultures. Specific focus in terms of topic, country, or art will vary by semester. Open to non-majors. Ursuline Studies Stage II Aesthetic Response satellite (AE).

AR 300
Visual Communication Design III (3/4)
This advanced course continues to develop the student's design skills in the digital environment. Students refine skills in typography, layout and design using QuarkXPress, Adobe Illustrator, and Adobe Photoshop on the Macintosh platform. Projects are specifically geared toward three-dimensional package design. Required for Visual Communication Design majors; open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 210, AR 211.

AR 301
Relief Printmaking (4)
Explorations in the relief print with special emphasis on the relation between image and process and the use of prints as a tool for social change. Students expand their use of the computer, printer and scanner, and they are encouraged to experiment with their relief plates as a foundation for digital additions and printing on digital archival paper. Required for Printmaking concentration; open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 203.

AR 302
Intaglio Printmaking (4)
Further studies in etching and the intaglio processes, including color prints and viscosity work. Students are encouraged to look at contemporary prints in relation to their work and to consider the importance of presenting and conserving prints, especially in light of the role of prints during periods of social change. Students use the digital equipment and programs available to enhance their work. Required for Printmaking concentration; open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 203.

AR 306
Wheel Throwing (4)
Students concentrate on creating vessels and sculptures while working on the potter's wheel. Basic forms such as the cylinder, cup, bowl, teapot, and altering shapes are taught. Technology is used to aid the student with design and concept. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 235.

AR 310
Photography (4)
This course offers a theoretical and practical examination of photography as a medium of communication. Students learn basic camera operation and darkroom techniques, while acquiring aesthetic language skills that are unique to the medium. Students will use the 35mm SLR camera, and begin to work with the digital camera. A 35mm SLR camera, manually operated, is required. Prerequisites: AR 106 Design Foundations I, or permission of the instructor.

AR 311
HTML and Web Design (3/4)
This course explores the basics of web design. Students learn the fundamentals of the computer language HTML through creating and previewing web pages. The principles, concepts and terminology used in web design and on-screen viewing are presented. Students create groups of web pages and complete web sites.Text editors,Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Internet Explorer and Netscape Navigator are used. Required for majors; open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 210 or permission of the instructor.

AR 315
Portrait II (4)
This course studies portrait painting in oil, acrylic, or pastel, with the objective of sharpening the painter's skills of observation, use of materials, methods of application, and ability to compose a painting that presents the sitter in a manner that is compelling to the viewer. Integral to the course is the study and discussion of contemporary portrait painting and portraiture as a modern art form. Prerequisites: AR 215 and AR 231.

AR 320
Advanced Drawing (4)
This course offers an exploration of the realms of creative drawing, with attention to materials, scale, subject matter, digital considerations, and personal statement. Open to non-majors. Prerequisites: AR 219 or 220.

AR 325
Alternative Methods in Handbuilding (4)
This course introduces alternative methods of handbuilding besides the pinch, coil, and slab techniques used in creating ceramic artwork. Mold-making and armature work are introduced, along with current methods used by ceramic artists, including technology, installation and time-based design processes. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 115, 235.

AR 332
Advanced Painting (4)
Using oil or water-based paints and various pastels, students continue their study of painting, with an emphasis on compositions that reflect the graphic and painting images of the 21st century. Students consider the relation between two- and three-dimensional representations of objects and pattern in various cultures, present their perspectives on directions in 21st-century painting, research specific painters and their influence on their own work. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 231.

AR 333
Digital Solutions I (4)
This course brings together various art majors from a variety of media and art studies in order to learn how best to aid their work using contemporary technology that can provide digital solutions to innovative and traditional studio subject matter. Prerequisites: Studio Foundations and one second-level course in a concentration, or permission of instructor.

AR 337
Intermediate Metalcraft (4)
This course focuses on the fundamental techniques of soldering, cloisonné and champleve while working with non-ferrous metals. Students build upon the skills, design knowledge, and conceptual ideas that their work in metals calls for. Students use technology as another tool, aiding them in their design work. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 200.

AR 348

Forming (4)
This course is for the advanced metalcraft concentrator; focus is placed on advanced techniques of forming and forging. Students learn the skills of sinking, crimping, raising, and stretching new shapes with non-ferrous metal and conceptualizing these shapes with new technology. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 200, 337.

AR 351
Reading Seminar in Art History (2)
This course offers art history majors and minors the opportunity to conduct independent, in-depth reading and research on a self-defined topic - in other words, it provides the opportunity to work as an art historian would and thus to gain an understanding of the discipline through practice. Special attention will be paid to the methods employed by art historians and their cultural underpinnings, as well as to how different publication venues contribute to the variety of art historical scholarship. This course culminates in a research proposal to be pursued in AR 490. Prerequisites: AR 362 recommended. Open to Art History majors and minors only.

AR 351, 352
Reading Seminar (2, 2)
This course involves reading and discussions of selected works of art, artists, and critics, and for the Art History major and results in a research paper. Open to majors only.

AR 360
Professional Practice (4)
This technology-supported course examines various legal and ethical aspects important to the professional artist. It bridges the world of student artist with that of the professional artist by teaching students how to enter shows, record their work, make contracts, present themselves to a gallery, prepare job interviews or graduate school. The course helps students become aware that they are constructive-knowing artists with a clear idea of how to use their voice to speak their values through their artwork. Open to Studio Art majors only. Corequisite: AR 441.

AR 362
Approaches to Art History (3)
AR 362 introduces students to the different methodological approaches involved in the study of art history; in other words, we will study the ideas that inform how art history is created. Students come to understand the variety of perspectives brought to bear on art objects, and through a case study of their own, learn to judiciously apply these approaches. The course also addresses key research techniques and materials to the study of art history and culminates in a research proposal utilizing the methodologies explored in class. Open to Art and Art History majors with at least 6 credits of art history, or with instructor's permission.

AR 400
Advanced Visual Communication Design (3/4)
This course continues to instruct students in developing a sense of the design process while beginning to prepare for the professional portfolio class. A series of advanced projects explores the expressive qualities of art elements such as line, shape, form, value, and texture. Special emphasis is placed on the selection and creative integration of type styles with images to be produced for cyberspace, the printed page, or 3D form. Required for Visual Communication Design majors; open to non-majors. Prerequisites: AR 210, 211.

AR 403
Special Studies in Painting (4)
Designed specifically for the art major concentrating in painting, this course may take any number of directions depending on the student's needs and interests in the discipline. After consultation with the instructor, the student develops a statement of purpose that includes a timeline for research and production and that allows for periodic critiques. Students are encouraged to explore particular concerns deeply so that they understand the concept of "mastery." Prerequisite: AR 332.

AR 404
Special Studies in Printmaking (4)
Designed specifically for the art major concentrating in printmaking, this course further develops student skills and concentrates on the formal presentation of prints and their archival care. Prerequisite: AR 301 or 302.

AR 429
Special Studies in Drawing (4)
Designed specifically for the art major concentrating in drawing, this course allows the student to select individual areas for investigation within the classroom setting of presentation and critique. Prerequisites: AR 320, 219, 107.

AR 436
Advanced Ceramics (4)
This course continues to build on the knowledge and skills learned in AR 235. The integration of concept, craft, refinement, material, and process is emphasized. The student creates a body of work that combines personal expression, skills, and creativity using contemporary technology and time-based presentation and with the option of mixed media installation. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 115, 235.

AR 437
Casting (4)
In this course for the advanced metalcraft concentrator, focus is placed on designing forms for nonferrous metal casting of small jewelry and sculpture. The student uses computer technology to help create designs. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 200, 337.

AR 438
Advanced Metalcraft (4)
This course is for the student concentrating in metalcraft; advanced work is produced with an emphasis on creating a cohesive body of artwork, including refinement, appropriate presentation, and conceptual designs that are meaningful to the student-artist. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 200, 337.

AR 440
Roman Art (3)
This course offers an introductory survey of Roman art and architecture from the sixth century B.C.E. through the fourth century C.E. During the course students are introduced to a variety of methods and techniques employed by art historians as they work to understand an art object in its cultural contexts. Special attention is paid to artwork in the collection of the Cleveland Museum of Art and significant architectural works in northeast Ohio. Prerequisites: The successful completion of Stage I of Ursuline Studies; AR 251 recommended.

AR 441, 442
Senior Studio (4,4)
These last courses are the continuation of study in drawing, painting, printmaking, ceramics, metal, and visual communication design. With the aid of technology, students develop concept, complete a body of work, and creatively present and install their work. A professional level of performance is emphasized throughout the year, culminating in an exhibition of the student's artwork. Students are encouraged to use their art as a means to express what they hold important, not only for themselves but for the larger community; also encouraged is networking and involvement in service to the community. Open to art majors only. Prerequisites: Foundation Studies; Portfolio Review; upper-level courses in their concentration; and Senior standing.

AR 445
Special Studies in Ceramics (4)
This course builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier courses. The integration of concept, craft, refinement, material, presentation and process are emphasized. Students create a body of work that explores their own vision and prepares them for specific approaches in the clay arts that will transition them into the professional world of art. Using new technology and contemporary practices, the student are encouraged to work with their own glazes, clay bodies, concepts, and presentations. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 115, 235.

AR 446
Clay and Glaze Calculation (4)
This course explores the nature of clay and glazes, chemical calculations, materials and processes that the clay artist uses while creating with clay. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 115.

All 400-level Art History courses have the same prerequisites:
The successful completion of Stage I of Ursuline Studies and any 200-level art history class. Those seeking to take a course at the 400-level without previous art history at Ursuline may only do so with permission from the instructor. A 400-level course is not open to those who have already taken the corresponding 200-level course.

AR 451
Ancient World Art (3)
A survey of world art from 30,000 B.C.E. through 1250 C.E. addressing art from Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, the Ancient Near East, Sub-Saharan Africa, India, as well as the Islamic world. Students are introduced to a variety of methods and techniques employed by art historians as they work to understand an art object. Special attention is paid to the relation a work of art has to the culture that produced it, and to the complex roles these objects play in contemporary society. Open to non-majors with permission.

AR 453

Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Art (3)
A survey of Western art and architecture from 1750 to 1900, addressing Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism and other modernist movements. Special attention is paid to art in local collections. Open to non-majors with permission.

AR 454
Twentieth-Century Art (3)
A survey of twentieth-century western art from the Fauves through Post-Modernism. Students are introduced to a variety of methods and theoretical approaches employed by art historians as they work to understand art objects through lectures, readings, and independent research. Special attention is paid to architecture in Cleveland and art in local collections. Open to non-majors with permission.

AR 455
Asian Art (3)
A survey of Asian Art that explores art from India, China, Japan and Korea. The survey begins with the civilization of the Indus valley and pre-Shang China and continues through the twentieth-century. Questions of style, visual organization and aesthetics are addressed in the context of each culture. Special attention is paid to art in local collections. Open to non-majors with permission.

AR 458
Special Studies in Metalcraft (4)
This course is for the metalcraft concentrator; focus is placed on integrating advanced techniques of soldering, designing latches and locks, and creating a body of work that builds on skills, knowledge, and the use of new technology to enhance the student's concepts of metal design. Mixed media and other alternative approaches are also encouraged. Open to non-majors. Prerequisite: AR 200, 337.

AR 460
Advocacy and Art (3)
This course is to further student's understanding as to how artists have, and can 'make a difference' through their art. Studies will touch upon the history of advocacy in various art disciplines, and can expect to engage in discussion, and assessment, regarding the methodologies applied in advocacy. Students will present final projects that reflect consideration of contemporary social issues either through documentation of an advocacy and / or research of possible advocacy situations. Required for studio majors. Prerequisites: Foundation Studies, advanced courses in studio, 6 to 9 credits of Art History, or permission of the instructor.

AR 461, 462
Independent Study (1-4, 1-4)
Study of a special topic in art. Approval of department chair required. Open to majors only.

AR 474
Senior Project: Portfolio (3)
Designed specifically for the Visual Communication Design major, this course enables the student to prepare a professional resume and portfolio with the guidance of the instructor and critique from other class members. Open to majors only.

AR 475
Academic Internship (1-4)
Supervised practical experience in professional settings. This is designed specifically for the Studio Arts major and the Art History major.

AR 490
Senior Thesis in Art History (1)
A capstone course for art history majors, the Senior Thesis allows students the opportunity to develop the topic they first proposed and explored in AR 351 (Readings in Art History) into a full-fledged thesis. Prerequisites: Completion of AR 351; concurrent enrollment or completion of AR 362.

AR 288, 488
Special Topics (4)

AR 199, 299, 399, 499
External Learning Assessment (credit varies)
Measurable and verifiable learning which has occurred outside of the traditional classroom setting. Numerical designation indicates level of proficiency in the topic. Courses for which there is an exact Ursuline College equivalent are listed by the appropriate numerical designation. "PL" is listed before all course titles for which credit is granted through external learning assessment.